Newquay 2010 – Day 2

We awoke to another grey and rainy day but set off undaunted for an outing.

In Cornwall it pays to study the rail and bus timetables to find out the possible routes between destinations. So it was that instead of waiting for the 10:13 train to Par we instead took  the bus to St Austell. The bus left earlier than the train and at St Austell we had main line rail links to our planned destinations. Using our rover tickets, we boarded the Penzance train.

The Paddington train stands in a rain-swept St Austell station
The Paddington train stands in a rain-swept St Austell station

Penzance is one of my favourite towns combining the facilities of a big town with the charm of an elegant small town with some history behind it. We roamed the town reacquainting ourselves with remembered parts and discovering new features.

Penzance: a view across the harbour
Penzance: a view across the harbour

We had lunch in the famous old Admiral Benbow with its figure of a sharpshooter on the roof. The interior is choc-a-bloc with ornaments, antiques and curios, very attractive and intriguing, and the food was good too.

The Admiral Benbow with the sharpshooter on the roof
The Admiral Benbow with the sharpshooter on the roof

We resumed our wanderings and discovered the Flea Market, which we had hitherto missed.

Inside the Penzance Flea Market
Inside the Penzance Flea Market

Reaching the long, sloping high street with its elevated pavement on one side, we stopped for a cream tea. After all, Cornwall is the best place to go for cream teas, isn’t it?

Sir Humphry Davy surveys the High Street
Sir Humphry Davy surveys the High Street

We decided now to catch the 16:00 Paddington train which calls at St Austell. The idea is that we can easily travel back to Newquay from St Austell, by bus if necessary, thus beating the early closure of rail services.


The grand old platform bridge at St Austell
The grand old platform bridge at St Austell, still in use

When we arrived at St Austell, the bus timetable showed that a 521 would depart for Newquay in about 20 minutes. As the weather was still grey and wet and an evening chill was beginning to be felt, we were happy to take this bus.

The 521 takes us back to Newquay
The 521 takes us back to Newquay

As we had had two good meals today, breakfast and lunch (not to mention the cream tea), we felt we could make do with a snack for supper. It was by now 6 pm but despite the late hour (in Cornish terms) we found a branch of Aldi open. They had cunningly hidden all the baskets and trolleys, presumably to prevent customers buying many items (though one enterprising customer had provided himself with the lid off a stout cardboard box to use as a tray), so we bought sliced veggie Emmenthal, pumpernickel bread and grapes. Back at the hotel we had tea, of course, trying out what we had bought from a sweet little specialist tea and coffee retailer we had discovered in Penzance.

There were surfers still active
There were surfers still active

On the way back to the hotel, we saw that there were surfers still active. I know they don’t fear the rain, seeing as they are wet already, but how they can bear the cold is beyond my comprehension. I would no more venture into the sea at this time of year than I would cut my throat with a rusty saw, let alone spend long hours bouncing up and down in the water as they do. I suppose it is a passion that no one can understand who has not been bitten by the bug.

Figurehead, Admiral Benbow
Figurehead, Admiral Benbow

Back in the room I transferred my photos to the laptop and geotagged them (using a Qstarz BT-Q1000X). I realized that the software allows you to store a trip and I will do this in the hope that this will allow me to create Google maps of our trips when I can once more connect to the Internet.

Stepped street, Penzance
Stepped street, Penzance

Copyright © 2010 SilverTiger, https://tigergrowl.wordpress.com, All rights reserved.

About SilverTiger

I live in Islington with my partner, "Tigger". I blog about our life and our travels, using my own photos for illustration.
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