Visiting the community garden

It is another warm, sunny day, a time to take things gently and not rush about. I decided to pay a visit to the Culpeper Community Garden as I had not been there for a while. I have already written about this fine community project – see Culpeper Community Garden.

Entrance to the community garden
Entrance to the community garden

The community garden is situated on one side of the Culpeper Park, the name being that of the 17th-century botanist, herbalist and physician, Nicholas Culpeper. Beside the entrance is an information board about the garden but I will here refer you to its website.

Entering the garden
Entering the garden

From the gate you find yourself on a path leading straight ahead. There are open, sunlight, areas and shady areas under the trees.

A path off to the side
A path off to the side

There are numerous paths, all tempting, and as they are not straight but curve one way and the other the only way to find where they go is to follow them!

The pond
The pond

I continued straight on and this brought me to the pond. At the moment it is covered with a layer of duck weed, as are most ponds and lakes at the moment. You may be able to spot the “heron” standing in the water. I had to take a good long look to be sure it wasn’t a real bird.

As well as water plants, the pond provides a home and mating area for frogs, newts and other creatures. A notice warns that the water is very deep.

Through the arch
Through the arch

After the pond, the path turns left and takes you through an arch of tree branches. (You need to bend if you are tall like me!)

Many different plants and flowers
Many different plants and flowers

The photo doesn’t do justice to the scene. There were so many different flowers of many colours that the phrase “a riot of colour” comes to mind.

No overall plan
No overall plan

One of the features of the garden that I like is that it is composed of individual gardens whose owners do what they will with their space and, as a result, there is no overall pattern: there are trees, shrubs and flowers here, there and everywhere, with curving paths threading between them.

Explosion of colour
Explosion of colour

Everywhere you look there is greenery and flowers, enhanced by combinations of sunlight and shade.

Paths and benches
Paths and benches

The paths continually tempt you to follow them, often with other paths branching off them. In corners here and there are benches where you can sit and enjoy the calm atmosphere.

Dead end?
Dead end?

Following this path, you might suspect you’ve reached a dead end but no: there is a sharp right turn that carries you onward.

Covered path
Covered path

The turn leads you to a covered path which, I think, is the only straight section of path in the whole garden.

Dense vegetation
Dense vegetation

On either side of the path are individual plots, each arranged according to the tastes of its gardener. Some are more open with rows of plants, others are dense with vegetation. Everything is green, fresh and healthy.

Wood pigeon
Wood pigeon

The path led straight on but I spied a wood pigeon feeding. As the garden was very quiet and he was happily eating, I preferred not to disturb him and went down a side path nearby.

Flowers beside the path
Flowers beside the path

On that path I spotted these bright red flowers which I am glad not to have missed.

Making for the exit
Making for the exit

I sat for a while on a bench, watching the birds and insects. It was very quiet (I saw only two other visitors) so there was a lot of wildlife to see. Then, st last, I made my way out.

A last glimpse
A last glimpse

Before passing through the gate, I took a last quick photo of the garden. It will remind me – if I need reminding! – to come back and visit from time to time and watch the changes of the seasons. Perhaps, too, I will again see the wood pigeon.

About SilverTiger

I live in Islington with my partner, "Tigger". I blog about our life and our travels, using my own photos for illustration.
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