Museum of the Home

We performed our usual shopping run this morning and returned home to put away the spoils.

The clock tower in reflected light
The clock tower in reflected light

After lunch, we set out again, starting our journey at the clock tower where we boarded a 394 single-deck bus. This threads its way along a complicated route, terminating at Homerton Hospital. We, however, did not travel quite that far.

Almshouses now Museum of the Home
Almshouses now Museum of the Home

We came here, to this impressive three-wing set of almshouses founded in the early 18th century as a bequest of the will of Sir Robert Jeffrye. Today, the building is part of a complex constituting the Museum of the Home. It was until fairly recently called the Jeffrye Museum but then the founder’s reputation suffered an eclipse owing to his connections with slavery. His name was removed from the museum’s name though his statue, with an inscription, still stands above the main entrance.

Entrance hall
Entrance hall

We have visited this museum many times but this was the first visit since the complex was enlarged and remodelled. Admission is free but thanks to Covid, you need to book a time for your visit. Our time was 3 pm.

Take a seat
Take a seat

I appreciated the old museum for its display of room settings from Tudor times to the modern day. They are still present but the enlarged museum displays much more than it used to with examples of the furniture and other contents of the home through the ages.

Cleaning implements
Cleaning implements

As well as a broad range of objects found in the home, there were videos to watch and information boards to read. I, though, was impatient to see my favourites, the room settings. I will show you just a few of these, so as not to bore you.

A hall of 1630
A hall of 1630

A parlour of 1695
A parlour of 1695

A parlour of 1790
A parlour of 1790

A parlour of 1870
A parlour of 1870

Loft style apartment of 1998
Loft style apartment of 1998

The Chapel
The Chapel

In the centre of the main wing, accessed through the main door, lies the chapel. It was a condition of being admitted as an occupant of an almshouse, that one attended Sunday services in the chapel.

Molly’s Cafe
Molly’s Cafe

As you might expect, there is a cafe attached to the museum. You have to leave the museum building and walk to what was once an independent pub but has been acquired by the museum and converted into its cafe.

Tea and lemon drizzle cake
Tea and lemon drizzle cake

We ordered tea and lemon drizzle cake for two. I was rather surprised at the price: more expensive than our cooked lunch at Cafe Sizzle yesterday. Still, I suppose that compensates for the free admission.

A park with ancient trees
A park with ancient trees

In front of the almshouses, separating them from the road, is a broad garden or park with ancient trees. No doubt the occupants could sit out here on warm days without being troubled by the traffic on the road.

Moon over the museum Photo by Tigger
Moon over the museum
Photo by Tigger

The stop for the 394 bus to take us home stands conveniently in front of the museum. We had a 10-minute wait for the bus during which time Tigger photographed an almost full moon over the roof of the almshouses.

The bus duly arrived and carried us along its tortuous backstreet route back to the Angel and home. It was good to see the museum again, especially the room settings which always fascinate me and are for me the main attraction.

About SilverTiger

I live in Islington with my partner, "Tigger". I blog about our life and our travels, using my own photos for illustration.
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4 Responses to Museum of the Home

  1. Anne Rutterford says:

    Looks like a great place. No matter how many pictures you post, I will never be bored.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What a fascinating place. Real history is best shown by the things belonging to hand used by ordinary people. What treasures are housed here for the future generations to see and try to understand the times.
    I mourn the ignorance of those who are emotionally driven by their own confused minds to try and rewrite history or erase it. There are such things a period pieces – reflecting those times – and should be viewed through with modern eyes – it was what it was – which makes you what you are. We are at risk of losing so much.
    Delight trip – the pictures always you take always capture not only the concrete image, but the past and the present.
    (Tigger’s moon shot is so good it might inspire a story/novel or two)

    Like

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