A long bus ride

Brunch
Brunch

We hunted around for somewhere to have lunch but without much success. In the end, we plumped for this place which offered, among other items, an all-day veggie breakfast.

Crossing the Dour
Crossing the Dour

We then made our way to the stop for the bus back to Folkestone, once more crossing the Dour as we went.

No shade at the bus stop
No shade at the bus stop

We knew what time our bus should arrive but of course, that was not when it actually arrived. The bus app behaved as though generating random numbers. The published timetable was a work of fiction.

Another view from our room
Another view from our room

After what seemed a surprisingly short journey, we reached the bus stop near our hotel. The above photo shows a section of beach and the Folkestone Harbour Arm, built during Victorian era. Ferries to Europe departed from here but with the cessation of those services, the Arm has become a public pier. The curving roof visible on the left is that of the old harbour railway station. The line was closed down in 2009 (officially in 2014), though there is a group trying to have it reopened. Find more about it here.

We made tea, sponged ourselves down and rested for a while, recovering from our long exposure to the sun while awaiting the delayed bus.

——————————

Riding the bus
Riding the bus

Later, we went out and caught another bus. I knew this would be a longish ride but not how long it would turn out to be. I photographed a couple of items along the way.

A Penfold pillar box
A Penfold pillar box

Beside a bus stop we spotted this antique pillar box, according to the design of John Wornham Penfold. Relatively few still exist “in the wild”.

A crossroads in Dynchurch
A crossroads in Dynchurch

At Dymchurch (see here for an etymology of the name), we were still in Kent but we had been travelling so long I was beginning to wonder if we were going to fall off the edge of the world.

Martello Tower
Martello Tower

We passed several Martello Towers, built to strengthen our coastal defences against a possible invasion by Napoleon.

Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway
Romney, Hythe & Dymchurch Railway

As time was passing, we eventually decided to call a halt here, at the terminus of this light railway than runs antique locomotives and rolling stock.

A view of the tracks
A view of the tracks

We had a view of the tracks of the RH&D Railway where the road crosses them by a bridge.

At the bus stop
At the bus stop

We found a bus stop and settled down to patiently await the next (no doubt delayed) bus. Contrary to expectation, it was more or less on time.

On the bus
On the bus

We boarded the bus with a feeling of relief, at least on my part. Curiously, the return journey felt quicker than the outward leg.

We left the bus at our usual stop near the hotel and, as we had not eaten since lunch, looked around to see what cafes or restaurants in the area were open. The short answer is none. Even the pubs we tried had stopped serving food by now. Yes, at 8:30 pm.

Herbert's
Herbert’s

This is when we chanced upon an establishment called Herbert’s. You are served through a slot in the transparent screen and there are a few tables and chairs outside on the cobbled road.

Our elegant repast Photo by Tigger
Our elegant repast
Photo by Tigger

The hot food on offer consisted of a range of toasties. We both had cheese and Marmite toasties, with ice cream to follow. To drink, I had green tea and Tigger coffee. The ice cream is not visible in the photo because the lady kindly kept it in the fridge for us until we were ready for it.

Having dined thus, we retired to our temporary home on the 8th floor and there, saving unforeseens, will we remain until tomorrow.

Good night, all!

About SilverTiger

I live in Islington with my partner, "Tigger". I blog about our life and our travels, using my own photos for illustration.
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