Broadgate

On returning from Burnham-on-Crouch yesterday, we lingered at Liverpool Street station for a coffee. Afterwards, as we walked through the station, it occurred to us to go for a little wander around Broadgate.

Escalator to Broadgate
Escalator to Broadgate
The narrowest escalators I have seen

The narrow escalator (too narrow for overtaking) gives access to a long corridor. This may be busy during the day when people are at work but in the evening it was eerily quiet.

Corridor
Corridor
Eerily quiet after hours

It was so quiet in fact, that in one of the doorways, a pair of lovers were curled up together in an embrace apparently oblivious to importunate passers-by such as ourselves.

Cross beams
Cross beams
All different colours

Looking up, I noticed that the bridge-like cross beams were all different colours. Either they are made of different stone or of some composite material dyed differently. I am not sure which.

155 Bishopsgate
155 Bishopsgate
Discreet side entrance

This mysterious entrance gives access to the Bishopsgate office complex and yet another Jamie Oliver restaurant, Jamie’s London, but the doors are unlocked only between 6.30 am and 7 pm.

Floor-level windows
Floor-level windows
Looking through corresponding windows into the station

A set of floor-level windows almost matches a corresponding set of windows in the station building next door, allowing the curious observer to see into the station, “as through a glass, darkly”.

A intriguing glimpse
An intriguing glimpse
Venus lies in wait

Through one of the last windows we get a glimpse of a massive sculpture outside in Exchange Square. It is necessary to go into the Square to appreciate the object fully.

Rear view
Rear view
Not the most flattering perspective

Viewing the lady from behind is perhaps not the most flattering perspective but it shows, by comparing her with the chairs nearby, how massive she is.

The Broadgate Venus
The Broadgate Venus
Sculpted by Fernando Botero and dated 1989

From the front, the Broadgate Venus reveals all her considerable charms. No emaciated catwalk kitten is she and the adjective “plump” can hardly characterize her massy figure. Love her or hate her, she cannot be ignored.

A grassy arena
A grassy arena
Somewhere to rest and eat your lunch

In fine weather, office workers come here to rest and eat their lunch. There is a grassy arena,

A water feature
A water feature
Steps, rocks and running water

a water feature,

Ping-pong tables
Ping-pong tables
Or table tennis, if you insist on taking it seriously…

and even a pair of ping-pong tables for those who like the rest vigorously.

Liverpool Street Station
Liverpool Street Station
Trains to exotic – and not so exotic – destinations

Or you could look over the railings into Liverpool Street Station, here where you have a good view of the platforms, and watch trains setting off for exotic destinations such as Southend-on-Sea, Chingford and even Burnham-on-Crouch!

Liverpool Street Bus Station
Liverpool Street Bus Station
Cramped but very busy during peak periods

For us, though, it was time to go to the bus station (entering from the end where we rarely go) and catch a bus for the Angel and home.

There are seemingly endlessly many odd corners of the city to discover and explore and a visit to what is all too boringly familiar to one person may seem like an interesting adventure to another. Quite often we follow the everyday path, looking neither to left nor to right when a step one way or the other might reveal an entirely new landscape.

Copyright © 2011 SilverTiger, https://tigergrowl.wordpress.com, All rights reserved.

About SilverTiger

I live in Islington with my partner, "Tigger". I blog about our life and our travels, using my own photos for illustration.
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2 Responses to Broadgate

  1. WOL says:

    In re: the Broadgate Venus, the adjective “rubinesque” comes to mind. Lovely little water feature with rocks. That area would be a nice place to lunch in.

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