Six faces and a lion

This evening on the way home from work we stopped off for coffee and then took a little stroll around the City of London. Needless to say, we took photographs of anything that interested us. I am presenting a selection of those photos here. There was no plan to the walk and I found myself taking photos more or less at random. From these I have select seven, all faces. Six are human and one is a lion (well, why not?).

Bearded face

Winged head

Mercury

Round face

King Charles

Sphinx

Lion

All of these faces are symbolic in one way or another but while I can identify Mercury (because of the serpents and the wings in his hair) and the golden-faced King Charles (I am not sure which Charles though I would guess Charles II), I am ignorant as to the identities or meanings of the others. I you can elucidate, please let me know.

Copyright © 2011 SilverTiger, https://tigergrowl.wordpress.com, All rights reserved.

About SilverTiger

I live in Islington with my partner, "Tigger". I blog about our life and our travels, using my own photos for illustration.
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2 Responses to Six faces and a lion

  1. WOL says:

    The top one is some sort of king — though whether mythologic or temporal is not clear. He is exceptionally well rendered, though. I believe the second and third ones are both Mercury. — the third one looks like it has a winged hat, and that thing underneath is rather caduceus looking. The second from the bottom is some sort of sphinx, I think, since sphinxes are female, have wings and have the body of a lion. I’d go with Charles II as the golden face also — the periwig is kind of a giveaway. The fourth one may be a putto, a cherub, or just a chubby little boy.

    • SilverTiger says:

      Thanks for your suggestions. I did suspect that the second one might also be mercury because of the wings but the absence of other attributes leaves a doubt in my mind.

      The fourth one might well be a cherub as it is found on the church of St Edmund the King in Lombard Street.

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