From St Pancras to Sutton

Plinth
Plinth

Tigger had a day off today and we didn’t want to waste it sitting at home, so we went out for a ramble.

Meeting Place
The Meeting Place

We started at St Pancras station where we had breakfast at the Camden Food Co cafe upstairs. Today they had porridge with “fruits of the forest”, our favourite. You probably know that at St Pancras there is a famous sculpture by Paul Day of a couple embracing, presumably because they have just met after an absence. It is not to everyone’s taste but it has become part of the scenery, so to speak. It’s called “Meeting Place” and I show it on the left, as a reminder.

Today we saw that a sculpted frieze had been added all around the plinth and I must say this impressed me a lot. The picture at top is a section of it, with the central couple reflecting the main sculpture. There is too much for me to summarize it in a few words, so I will not try. You really need to see it for yourself. It consists of a series of tableaux, linked by the theme of travel by train and tube.

Platform reflected
Platform reflected

There are some subtle effects. In the above section, for example, the scene is a crowded tube platform seen reflected in a pair of spectacles. You may think that the differences are due to the slightly different angles of view but closer inspection shows that the two scenes are time-shifted as well – compare the position of the man’s hand on the woman’s bottom in each image.

Shrine to Jean Charles de Menezes, Stockwell
Shrine to Jean Charles de Menezes, Stockwell

But soon we were off and – unusually for her – Tigger wanted to take the tube. We headed south, to the end of the Northern Line.

We broke our journey briefly at Stockwell where I photographed this shrine to Jean Charles de Menezes. You probably know the story – that of an innocent man shot to death in error by the police – but if you do not, there is no shortage of information on the Web, from sober reports to rabid conspiracy theories.

We left the tube at Morden, the last station on the Northern Line. We had hoped to have coffee at Morden Hall, a hotel with a restaurant and bar open to the public, which we had visited before, but this time it had closed down.

Morden Hall
Morden Hall

Open or closed, the Hall is set in beautiful grounds, today known as the Morden Hall Park and owned by the National Trust. It was beginning to rain as we walked through the park, making the photos a little dull. In the one below you may be able to spot the heron near the centre of the picture (click for a larger version).

Morden Hall Park
Morden Hall Park

Walking through the Park, you come to Morden Road Tramlink stop. Tramlink is a modern tram system and very impressive it is too. In town, it behaves like a bus and out of town like a light railway, covering ground very rapidly.

The tram arrives at Dundonald Road station
The tram arrives at Dundonald Road station

At Wimbledon, We decided it was time for an early lunch. Just as we thought this, we spotted an Indian restaurant. The fact that they served both vegetarian thali and lassi was enough to tempt us in. Unfortunately, the food was mediocre, so we will not be adding this place to the list of restaurants to return to.

After lunch, we caught a bus to Sutton. Why? Well, why not? It was probably not the sort of day you need to show Sutton at its best. I am not sure what sort of day you would need, actually.

The Sutton Heritage Mosaic
The Sutton Heritage Mosaic

The failing light and the gloomy sky were a disincentive to photography. It felt as if it was time to go home. I noticed this building with painted window arches. It was to be today’s last photo.

Painted windows, Sutton
Painted windows, Sutton

We took the bus back to Morden – a very slow bus that went on a long circuitous route – and then took the tube back to Angel.

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About SilverTiger

I live in Islington with my partner, "Tigger". I blog about our life and our travels, using my own photos for illustration.
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2 Responses to From St Pancras to Sutton

  1. Villager says:

    I love the look of that tram; I don’t know what it is about trams – perhaps that they actually go down real streets, unlike most trains, and you feel like you’re really part of a town.

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