Great Yarmouth 2009

Dereham
Dereham

Below you see the hotel breakfast room. It is in the basement. When you enter the dimly lit room, it is natural to be attracted by the light from the windows. Every table has a number on it corresponding to a room in the hotel. You are supposed to sit at the table corresponding to your room number even though there have never been more than two other tables occupied while we were having breakfast. If you sit at the window, you are gently led back to your correct table.

Hotel breakfast room
Hotel breakfast room

It’s another warm sunny day today, so much so that I have finally relinquished my jacket and gone into shirtsleeves like everyone else. Those who know me, know what a momentous step that is!

Busy street, Kings Lynn
Busy street, Kings Lynn

The fine weather made it a good day to visit King’s Lynn. As we are riding the buses today, the journey is quite a long one. I am not a fan of long bus rides because the knee room is usually limited and the seats not very comfortable and I end up feeling cramped. Nonetheless, bus rides can be more fun than train journeys, especially where the roads are narrow and winding.

Capt George Vancouver, navigator and surveyor
Capt George Vancouver, navigator and surveyor

We started by walking to the bus station where we boarded the X1 bus. ‘X’ stands for “express” but the trip still takes about 2 hours 20 minutes. If necessary, you can break your journey at various points as the buses run every 30 minutes during the day.

Shortly after arriving at Kings Lynn, we went for lunch. We found that Antonio’s on Baxter Plain. The food was good (and there was a lunch-time deal, too) though the service was rather slow.

The Custom House, 1683
The Custom House, 1683

After lunch we started to tour the town starting with the Custom House, which is nowadays a visitor information centre and museum explaining King’s Lynn’s trading history and membership of the Hanseatic League.

Faces on the wall Faces on the wall
Faces on the wall

At one time, Kings Lynn comprised two towns, not just one, and each had its own market. Today, the Sat­ur­day Market and the Tuesday Market still take place in their respective venues.

Kings Lynn is a beautiful town and there are enough buildings and views to keep a photographer happy for days, let alone a few hours. Here is just a small sample.

Kings Lynn Arts Centre
Kings Lynn Arts Centre
The Great Ouse River
The Great Ouse River
The Corn Exchange, 1854
The Corn Exchange, 1854

A haunted pub, Swaffham
A haunted pub, Swaffham

From Kings Lynn we took the X1 back towards Norwich but with the in­ten­tion of break­ing the journey along the way. Our first stop was at Swaffham where we had a drink at the King’s Arms. Here they regaled us with stories of the pub ghost which, among other things, was naughty enough to pinch the bottom of the landlord’s girlfriend while she was in the bathroom.

We caught the next bus and stopped at Dereham, where the poet William Cowper died in 1800, apparently.

Old Post Office, Swaffham
Old Post Office, Swaffham
Town sign, Swaffham
Swaffham Town sign
View of Dereham
View of Dereham
 

We discovered the Akaash Tandoori restaurant and as it was now 7pm it seemed reasonable to have dinner.

War Memorial, Dereham
War Memorial, Dereham

Dereham Town Arms
Dereham Town Arms

We ordered a vegetable thali and it was very good. By the time we had finished the meal, the running interval of the X1 had decreased to 60 minutes. We therefore wanted to be sure we caught the 20:34 which would take us all the way back to Great Yarmouth. Fortunately, we managed this comfortably.

The bus ride to Gt Yarmouth was un­e­vent­ful. At the bus station we had the prospect of a walk to the hotel but we decided that as we had taken plenty of exercise yesterday and today we could justify taking a cab.

What a luxurious end to the day!

Night scene, Great Yarmouth
Night scene, Great Yarmouth

About SilverTiger

I live in Islington with my partner, "Tigger". I blog about our life and our travels, using my own photos for illustration.
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2 Responses to Great Yarmouth 2009

  1. I am not a big fan of Gt Yarmouth – it always strikes me as soulless. My mother used to go there as a child and on one occasion I went on a visit with her and she showed me where all the old cinemas/theatres etc were and told me how people would dress up to walk along the prom. I warmed to it a bit then but it is certainly nothing like that now. You are lucky in summer if people put any clothes on at all to walk along the prom.

    I did chuckle re the guest house. I remember once staying at a very old-fashioned one somewhere (Weston super mere perhaps) and breakfast was between 7 and 9 i think. We were just about to open our door at 9.01 to come to breakfast when the guesthouse woman was hammering on the door shouting at us to get up. It was like being at boarding school.

    I went to King’s Lynn for the first time a month or so back and I liked it too.

    Hope you had a good holiday overall. Loved the Silver Tiger. Think you should definitely get him a hat!!

    • SilverTiger says:

      As I hope to have shown in my write-up, I can see signs of a more elegant and stylish Great Yarmouth but I think I see in the present a neglect of this past, so that the town has become brash and, in your word, soulless.

      I can’t imagine we shall be hurrying back.

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